Sunday, May 27, 2012

CAPpings - Corrosion of metals over a long time can cause breakdown and loss of the dental implant as well as health problems for the patient

Metallic ions released as the result of corrosion of dental implants react with other components of the body, leading to sensitivity, inflammation, and, ultimately, autoimmune disease.

Know Galvanic Cell (Battery) set up in Saliva - "Oral Galvanism"


Corrosion of metals over a long time can cause breakdown and loss of the dental implant as well as health problems for the patient.

BATTERY-MOUTH
Titanium implants constantly release metal ions into the mouth. This chronic exposure can trigger hypersensitivity, inflammation and allergies, as well as autoimmune disease in people with high sensitivity. The metal implants can become part of a charged battery. All that is needed to make a battery is two or more different metals and a liquid medium (electrolyte) that can conduct electricity. Metal implants, fillings, crowns, partials, and orthodontic appliances provide the dissimilar metals, and saliva in the mouth serves as the electrolyte. This phenomenon, called “oral galvanism,” creates two major concerns.

First, the electrical currents increase the rate of corrosion (or dissolution) of metal-based dental restorations. Even precious metal alloys continuously release ions into the mouth due to corrosion, a process that gnaws away at the metal’s surface. These ions react with other components of the body, leading to sensitivity, inflammation, and, ultimately, autoimmune disease. Increasing the corrosion rate, therefore, increases the chance of developing immunologic or toxic reactions to the metals.

These electrical potentials, especially those developed by implants, set in a chronic, degenerative and inflamed section of the bone, can disturb local physiology and affect the body’s entire regulatory ability through osseous, lymphatic, immune, vascular, endocrine, autonomic nervous and meridian systems.

A second concern is that some individuals are very susceptible to these internal electrical currents. Dissimilar metals in the mouth can cause unexplained pain, nerve shocks, ulcerations and inflammation. Many people also experience a constant metallic or salty taste, a burning sensation in the mouth, and insomnia.

Article Source: http://www.westonaprice.org/dentistry/dental-implants-an-integrative-perspective
Publication Date: Jan 2012

 

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