Thursday, August 23, 2012

CAPpings - Dental Implants - Titanium implants may carry risk of corrosion

Titanium medical implants used in dental prostheses and bone-anchored hearing aids may be less robust than commonly believed. Researchers have found evidence to suggest that in environments where there is no significant wear process, microscopic particles of titanium can be found in the surrounding tissue, which may have a negative impact on the devices, as this can potentially be pro-inflammatory.

Globally, more than 1000 tonnes of titanium (Ti) is implanted into patients in the form of biomedical devices on an annual basis. Ti is perceived to be ‘biocompatible’ owing to the presence of a robust passive oxide film (approx. 4 nm thick) at the metal surface. However, surface deterioration can lead to the release of Ti ions, and particles can arise as the result of wear and/or corrosion processes. This surface deterioration can result in peri-implant inflammation, leading to the premature loss of the implanted device or the requirement for surgical revision.

Soft tissues surrounding commercially pure cranial anchorage devices (bone-anchored hearing aid) were investigated using synchrotron X-ray micro-fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that minimal load-bearing Ti implants, which are not subjected to macroscopic wear processes, can release Ti debris into the surrounding soft tissue. As such debris has been shown to be pro-inflammatory, we propose that such distributions of Ti are likely to effect to the service life of the device.

The study “Do ‘passive’ medical titanium surfaces deteriorate in service in the absence of wear?” was published online on 25 July in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface
Article Source: http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/early/2012/07/23/rsif.2012.0438.short
Article Feed: http://www.dental-tribune.com/articles/content/scope/news/region/europe/id/9437
Publication Date: 09 Aug 2012

Saturday, August 18, 2012

CAPpings - Home Remedy for Corrosion - Affection with Family Favorites prompts maintenance of old cookware - How to clean and season old and rusty Cast Iron pan?

Affection with Family Favorites prompts maintenance of old cookware - A Home Remedy for cleaning and seasoning old and rusty Cast Iron Pan.




We all love our mothers' old pots and pans, simply because they have been great companions to all the delicious and nutritious meals moms cook for us all these years. There must be at least a frying pan in the kitchen that has been there since as long as we can remember, and it usually is the family's favorite one.

The only problem is, any cast iron will rust eventually, even if it takes a few decades. Removing surface rust from the family's favorite cast iron skillet could be agonizing, if you don't know the correct way of doing it.

Article Source: http://home24malaysia.blogspot.com/2012/08/tuesday-tips-how-to-clean-rusty-cast.html
Publication Date: 14 August 2012



What You Need

Materials
The end chunk of a potato (enough to be able to hold firmly)
Course salt
A rusty cast iron skillet
A little vegetable oil (canola or olive will do)

Equipment
Gloves (optional, but recommended)

Instructions
1. Place your rusty skillet in the sink and sprinkle a couple tablespoons of salt into it.

2. Take your chunk of potato and start scrubbing. The moisture from the potato will be enough to help the salt dig in to the rust.
3. The salt will get dirty very quickly. You may choose to rinse out the pan to survey your progress. If there is still rust, add more salt and repeat Step 2.
4. Continue to the sides, edges, bottom and handle of your pan.
5. Rinse thoroughly and pat dry.
6. Place pan on stove burner, this will help dry any remaining moisture.
7. Once dry, put a small amount of vegetable oil in the pan and rub it in with a paper towel.
8. Keep pan over low heat for at least 30 minutes.
9. Let skillet cool. Make sure to wipe off any excess oil before storing your skillet. If you leave extra oil in the pan it can turn rancid.
10. Every time you use your pan, after you've cleaned it put the pan on a low burner and repeat the oil and paper towel step. It's best to store your pan in the oven, but it worked much better when stoves had pilot lights that stayed on (thus keeping ambient moisture away from your pans).

Your seasoned and loved cast-iron skillet will now looks brand new!
Article Source: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-clean-and-season-old-ru-151535

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

CAPpings - India - Sewage water leaks into drinking water in Bhubaneswar, Orissa

Sewage water leaks into drinking water in Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Following complaints of skin and stomach ailments in the area, the public health department has stopped supplying pipe water and is providing water through tankers.



BHUBANESWAR: For the last seven days residents of Ashok Nagar have been getting contaminated water. Residents of the area alleged sewage water has been leaking into piped water. Following complaints of skin and stomach ailments in the area, the public health department has stopped supplying pipe water and is providing water through tankers.

"A few days ago I detected a stench in the pipe water and later we became certain it was the smell of sewage," said Harman Das, a resident of Ashok Nagar. By the time he realized this, however, his wife had developed stomach infections, he said. "My neighbours also had the same complaint. Many of them had started suffering from skin irritation, and we immediately lodged a complaint with the public health and engineering division-I (PHED)," he added.

Article Source: http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-07-31/bhubaneswar/32960360_1_sewage-water-pipe-water-phed
Publication Date: 31 July 2012

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

CAPpings - India - Transportation -The All-Composite Corrosion Resistant Bus Comes To India

A composite bus is lighter, consumes less fuel and resists corrosion and damage better than steel-bodied buses. While the initial cost is higher, its maintenance is cheaper making the total cost of ownership attractive.


The All-Composite Bus Comes To India


A technology that can make passenger buses lighter and more efficient comes to India in its search for mainstream acceptance. The idea of a composite bus is as simple as it is compelling. In the manufacture of a conventional bus, a chassis or the basic framework to hold all the parts is made with steel. Then, a body is built on it using more steel. A lot of welding goes into binding everything together. In the end, we have a very heavy product that has thousands of independent components.

On the other hand, a composite bus body is just two moulds fused together. Engines, seats and other stuff are fitted into this shell. And voila, the bus is ready. But the irony is that the all-composite bus is not in the mainstream anywhere in the world. In fact, it has seen wide adoption only in the US state of California. From European nations to Korea, bus operators are warming up to this technology but are yet to make large-scale commitments. Even in the US, success has not been easy. The pioneer, North American Bus Industries (NABI), had to wait for nearly a decade before it got accepted in the market.

India is on the threshold of becoming one of the hottest markets for buses in the world. Economic growth has led to a whopping increase in public transport needs in its burgeoning cities. For long, the demand was for only about 30,000 buses a year but the graph has now taken a steep turn upwards. In 2010, bus sales in India reached a record 38,000. Industry experts expect the number to reach as high as 60,000 by 2015.

Much of this demand will arise for better quality, high-tech and luxury buses. Till recently, the market was dominated by rickety, noisy buses that broke bones. In many cities, commuting was a nightmare because too many people were crammed into too few buses that were poorly maintained. Cash-strapped state-run bus corporations bought the cheapest models available and never invested in modern technology, emission reduction or passenger comfort.


Article Source: http://forbesindia.com/article/big-bet/the-allcomposite-bus-comes-to-india/24892/1
Publication Date: 12 May 2012

Saturday, August 11, 2012

CAPpings - India - As Drinking Water Pipelines age, Contamination proliferates - A biggest concern for the Public - Nagpur to get contaminated water for 5 more years

As Drinking Water Pipelines age, Contamination proliferates - A biggest concern for the public in Nagpur - The entire water network spread over 550km in Nagpur is old and requires to be replaced. The work to replace the pipeline will be undertaken under 24X7 water supply project. Until that work is completed, the problem of contaminated water supply cannot be solved.


Nagpur to get contaminated water for 5 more years

NAGPUR: The sad state of affairs at Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) came to fore on Monday when the civic body warned it cannot guarantee water free of contamination for the next five years at least. Executive engineer of NMC's water works department Shashikant Hastak made this statement in the house during the general body meeting on Monday.

The entire water network spread over 550km in Nagpur is old and requires to be replaced. The work to replace the pipeline will be undertaken under 24X7 water supply project. Until that work is completed, the problem of contaminated water supply cannot be solved.

Making this scary statement, which shocked the entire house, Hastak, who is also executive director of Nagpur Environmental Services Limited (NESL), a special purpose vehicle for monitoring 24X7 water supply project, said the level of water contamination may be brought down but there is no hope for complete resolution of the problem for five years.

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/nagpur/Nagpur-to-get-contaminated-water-for-5-more-years/articleshow/15010982.cms

Publication Date: 17 July 2012

Thursday, August 9, 2012

CAPpings - India - Corrosion of old drinking water pipelines is posing the threat of contamination in Chennai - 650km out of 2000km pipelines replaced with new ductile iron and mild steel pipes

Corrosion of drinking water pipelines is posing the threat of contamination in Chennai - Finally, waking up to the threat of water contamination in the city, Metrowater has started replacing pipelines. More than 2,300km of pipelines that criss-cross the city were laid in the mid 1960s. Now, many of them may have corroded, leading to seepage of sewage and other impurities into the pipes.

650km water pipes changed, twice as much still to go.

CHENNAI: Finally, waking up to the threat of water contamination in the city, Metrowater has started replacing pipelines. More than 2,300km of pipelines that criss-cross the city were laid in the mid 1960s. Now, many of them may have corroded, leading to seepage of sewage and other impurities into the pipes.

Public health experts say this is a crucial step in preventing waterborne diseases. Metrowater has got Rs60 crore under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) to replace all the drinking and sewerage water pipelines within the older city limit.
The department had identified'more than 2,000km of pipelines along 15,000 roads. About 650km of pipelines running under areas such as Guindy, Virugambakkam, T Nagar, Saidapet, Choolai, Royapuram, KK Nagar and Villivakkam have been replaced with new ductile iron and mild steel pipes. "Most of the pipelines in the old areas were of cast iron, which rust over time. We will replace the old pipes by December-end," said a Metrowater official.

The organization has been facing problems clearing sewerage and supplying drinking water. The city has around five lakh water connections. Leaky pipelines are the main cause of water contamination. "Only if there are leaks do sewage water seep in. The liquid also overflows on the road only when the links are weak, and not able to withstand pressure," said former assistant city health officer Dr Damodaran Reddy.

Health officers say water contamination happens frequently during monsoon, which is why Metrowater increases the chlorine content in water by five times. Experts also feel that having a common enclosures for garbage collection in neighbourhoods could have also aggravated the problem.

Article Source: http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-08-07/chennai/33082104_1_metrowater-sewage-water-water-contamination
Publication Date: 07 August 2012