Sunday, October 27, 2013

CAPpings- India - Water Conservation - Suez Wins Contracts to Curb Water Pipeline Leaks in Bangalore and Pune

Water contract awarded to curb unaccounted-for-water losses in Bangalore, the high-tech city to 16 percent from 42 percent over the next five to eight years and pipeline leaks in Pune. India is spending 589 billion rupees ($9.6 billion) to improve area water supplies and treatment systems, according to the government.

Suez Wins Water Contracts in India Cities to Curb Leaks

Suez Environnement (SEV), Europe’s second-biggest water company, won contracts to improve supplies and reduce leak losses in southern and western India.

Suez and Indian partner SPML Infra Ltd. (SPML) will help cut water leaks across a 26.5 square kilometer (10.2 square mile) area of Bangalore, the utility said today in an e-mail. It’s planning infrastructure works to curb unaccounted-for-water losses in the high-tech city to 16 percent from 42 percent over the next five to eight years, the French company said.

The utility was also awarded a contract in Pimpri-Chinchwad near Pune in western India to detect and repair leaks in area water-distribution systems. The contracts are worth 20 million euros ($27.5 million), Suez said.

“India is one of the priority countries in emerging markets and we plan to bid for more city-based water projects in the future,”

Article Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-22/suez-wins-water-contracts-in-india-cities-to-curb-leaks.html
Publication Date: 23 Oct 2013

Sunday, October 20, 2013

CAPpings - India - Acidic gas release from drainage pollutes environment and also corrodes components of air conditioners, refrigerators and television - Corrosion threat for public in South Delhi

Apart from the environmental damage, the drains are giving NCR residents another reason to complain. Gases emitted by the drains corrode pipes in air-conditioners, refrigerators and television, making gas leaks a frequent problem. Those who live near the drains are forced to spend thousands of rupees every year for refilling the gas. 

A drain on the pocket, every which way

Whether you are in South Delhi’s posh Defence Colony, in a DDA colony abutting the Barapullah drain, one of the many colonies lining the Najafgarh drain or in Noida’s buzzing Sector 18, you can’t avoid the foul smell emanating from open drains carrying sewage. The uncovered drains not only stink, they also endanger public health and the environment. And with roughly 50 per cent of all drains being uncovered, the problem is huge.

But this was not always the case, according to Manoj Misra of non-government organisation Yamuna Jiye Abhiyaan. “These drains were the original tributaries of the Yamuna. They were a part of the natural drainage system of the city. The open drains were never meant to carry waste water, but rapid expansion and inadequate planning made improvised sewers out of them.”

Apart from the environmental damage, the drains are giving NCR residents another reason to complain. Gases emitted by the drains corrode pipes in air-conditioners, refrigerators and television, making gas leaks a frequent problem. Those who live near the drains are forced to spend thousands of rupees every year for refilling the gas.

Rohit Dhawan, an Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi qualified electrical engineer who lives next to the Defence Colony nallah, noted: “When organic matter decays, it lets off gases. These are methane and sulphur dioxide, which have a rotten egg smell. Sulphur dioxide forms sulphuric acid when it comes in contact with water or moisture. It is this sulphuric acid that corrodes the copper in ACs and TVs.” Mr. Dhawan further explained: “ACs have copper pipes in the cooling section through which the coolant passes. The sulphuric acid corrodes these pipes. It can be observed as the black covering on the cooling pipes. Similarly, all the circuits in electronic equipment are of copper. These get corroded and lead to malfunctions.”

Pooja Chandok, a resident of Sector 40 in Noida, said it was only when her family moved to Noida, where she lives close to a large open drain, that she became aware of the problem. “We had lived in other parts of Delhi, but never had to refill the gas in our ACs every year until we came to Noida. Every year, we have to spend about Rs.10,000 on getting gas filled — it costs around Rs.2,000 per AC.”

Uday Kumar, an electrical repairman in Noida, said the average life-span for a gas refill is three months. The intensity of the gases emitted by the drains makes a brand new copper pipe show signs of corrosion within a month. But he is not complaining, for it gets him work. On the other hand, Meenakshi Oberoi, a resident of Noida Sector 25, is fed up with her recurring expenditure on air-conditioner upkeep. The large open drain behind her house means the ACs in her house need gas refills every other year. But she has made a deft move and “switched to non-branded ones because they work a little better in Noida”.

With increasing competition, residents have discovered that white-goods manufacturers had, in order to cut prices, compromised on quality too. “In the last 10 years, many manufacturers started using thinner cooling pipes. This has resulted in their faster corrosion. Corrosion will occur, but the period between breakdowns/leakages can be increased by using thicker pipes in the ACs,” explained Mr. Dhawan.

As if the gas leaks weren’t bad enough, residents living in the vicinity of open drains are also having trouble in getting annual maintenance contracts (AMCs) for them.

A resident of Ambika Vihar in West Delhi, Anil Ahluwalia, said: “One authorised service franchisee did not give me an AMC for my AC for nearly three years. The reason given was that my house was near the Najafgarh drain and hence my AC was more prone to defects such as gas leaks.”

Mr. Ahluwalia said he has to pay the service centre visiting charges as well as bear other expenses without an AMC. “It costs me more as I need to get the gas filled twice a year. However, my relatives living in a colony nearby don’t face any such problem as their home is away from the drain.”

Meanwhile, Sameer Bhandari of utility services said a franchisee cannot refuse to do an AMC. “We might charge extra in the Vikaspuri belt, which includes areas of Paschim Vihar and Vikaspuri near the drain, including Ambika Vihar. If the AMC for a one-and-half tonne window AC costs Rs. 2,000 plus taxes in other areas, in these areas it would be R. 3,000 plus taxes. This includes any spare parts plus gas.”

Agreeing, Ms. Chandok said AMCs in Noida are more expensive than other areas due to the frequent gas leaks. “One company had started a five-year AMC scheme, so many of us bought their product. But they soon realised that this was not cost-effective and discontinued the scheme.”


Dealing with the nallahs of the National Capital Region, as even AC manufacturers have realised, is a losing proposition.

Article Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Delhi/a-drain-on-the-pocket-every-which-way/article5253722.ece
Publication Date: 20 Oct 2013

Sunday, October 13, 2013

CAPpings- India - Water Pipeline Leakage - Another pipe burst; supply disrupted in Thiruvananthapuram - Corrosion is identified as the major cause

The bursts on the 1,200-mm transmission main have been a regular feature, with the 15-year-old pipeline being weak and corroded at several points. Work on a Rs.50 crore-project to replace the pipeline, from Aruvikkara to Peroorkada with mild steel pipes, is dragging on. Officials said it would take at least another month to complete the project.

Another pipe burst; supply disrupted in Thiruvananthapuram

The pre-stressed concrete (PSC) transmission mainline carrying water from Aruvikkara to the Observatory Hills tank, known for numerous bursts in the recent past, lived up to its notorious record with a major burst on Tuesday.

The burst, noticed around 4 p.m. near the Karakulam bridge on the Thiruvananthapuram-Shencottah road, is likely to disrupt water supply at several places in the heart of the city and towards the western parts till Wednesday evening.

Kerala Water Authority (KWA) officials said the burst occurred in a portion of the 1,200-mm mainline that narrowed down to 1,000 mm at the particular point. Excavation work was on to remove the mud over the pipeline and ascertain how big the leak or burst was. This would take several hours. A mild steel pipe piece would have to be lowered into the trench and welded on to the existing pipe at both ends to replace the affected portion. Repairs would take up to 24 hours. Normal water supply to the affected areas was likely to be restored only towards Wednesday evening, they said.


The bursts on the 1,200-mm transmission main have been a regular feature, with the 15-year-old pipeline being weak and corroded at several points. Work on a Rs.50 crore-project to replace the pipeline, from Aruvikkara to Peroorkada with mild steel pipes, is dragging on. Officials said it would take at least another month to complete the project.

Article Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Thiruvananthapuram/another-pipe-burst-supply-disrupted-in-thiruvananthapuram/article5216651.ece
Publication Date: 09 October 2013

Thursday, October 3, 2013

India - Railways - Corrosion Control efforts - ICF Steel beauty goes to Mumbai - Country’s first stainless steel Electric Multiple Unit coaches, designed and manufactured by the Integral Coach Factory (ICF)


Stainless steel minimise corrosion maintenance. Integral Coach Factory  will completely switchover to stainless steel coaches in four years.



Country’s first stainless steel Electric Multiple Unit coaches, designed and manufactured by the Integral Coach Factory (ICF) for  Mumbai Urban Transport Project (MUTP), was flagged off from the ICF, here on Tuesday.

The first prototype of 12-car rake that was flagged off on Tuesday was manufactured under the phase two of MUTP. ICF bids to supply a total of 72 car rakes to Mumbai Railway Vikas Corporation (MVRC), which is executing the Rs 3,000 crore project.

The stainless steel EMUs have been manufactured by the Integral Coach Factory  operates on alternate current traction using the state-of-the-art IGBT technology based on three-phase propulsion system. The first of its kind technology in the country is supplied by German-based Bombardier Transportation.

According to officials, the stainless steel coaches having straight sidewall design, developed on Linke Hoffman Busch (LHB) platform, as against the regular bell-shaped coaches in India would make trains run faster.

The coaches are more spacious and have force air ventilation system mounted on roofs to avoid entry of water. The coaches have wider windows, improved interiors, better aerodynamics, rugged user-friendly locks and latches which are eco-friendly, thereby reducing consumption of carbon and fossil fuels and emissions, the officials added.

The EMUs made using IGBT technology are 30 per cent more energy efficient than normal EMUs, including those supplied under Phase-I of the project. These units would help Mumbai suburban services save around `100 crore per year.

Rakesh Saksena, chairman and managing director of MRVC, said, “Around 7.5 million commuters use suburban trains everyday in Mumbai. Phase-I has already brought down overcrowding to an extent and phase-II would further reduce it.”

According to Pankaj Kumar, chief mechanical engineer, “Stainless steel minimise corrosion maintenance. Integral Coach Factory  will completely switchover to stainless steel coaches in four years. The second prototype rake would be ready before the end of October.”

Article Source: http://newindianexpress.com/cities/chennai/ICF-Steel-beauty-goes-to-Mumbai/2013/10/02/article1814339.ece
Publication Date: 03 October 2013