Wednesday, December 3, 2014

India - Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) has realized the importance of reducing the massive water losses

Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) has realized the importance of reducing the massive water losses going on for last many years. The process to stop water losses has been started with bulk water audit.



Nagpur: Finally, Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) has realized the importance of reducing the massive water losses going on for last many years. The process to stop water losses has been started with bulk water audit. Almost half of the audit has been completed and is expected to be finished in the next few months.

Mayor Pravin Datke, former mayor and MLC Anil Sole and municipal commissioner Shyam Wardhane held a review meeting with private water operator Orange City Water Private Limited at Kanhan water treatment plant on Monday.

Datke said OCW was directed to submit water audit's half report to the NMC within a week. "Audit up to overhead water tanks has been completed and the audit for water lines up to the households will take some time," he said.

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/nagpur/OCW-claims-to-have-completed-half-of-bulk-water-audit/articleshow/45340972.cms
Publication Date: 02 December 2014

Monday, November 10, 2014

India - Present awareness for corrosion is very limited in water infrastructure. Corrosion risk increases in an uneconomical way when water of varied composition is handled through pipeline networks with assets bearing mixed bag of materials of construction.

We come across numerous incidents of drinking water contamination with sewer system due to corrosion induced pipeline leakages. These pipelines have been laid very close to sewer transportation.


Contamination proliferates when the source water with contaminants is transported through water distribution system that uses a variety of unproven materials of construction.  We come across numerous incidents of drinking water contamination with sewer system due to corrosion induced pipeline leakages. These pipelines have been laid very close to sewer transportation. Our water supply concept significantly changed from the consumer owned water source to the collection and distribution managed by centralized water supply systems. Corrosion risk increases in an uneconomical way when water of varied composition is handled through pipeline networks with assets bearing mixed bag of materials of construction.  The present awareness for corrosion is very limited in water infrastructure. We need to turn Water Rust to Water TRUST to minimize corrosion induced pipeline leakages and conserve our present water resources.

Our national water policy should include norms for selecting suitable materials of construction and implementing corrosion control activities. Present water quality monitoring is not adequate to capture corrosive situations.


India - Contaminated tap water supplied to DLF Layout in Bangalore

Contaminated tap water supplied to DLF Layout. While the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) has hiked the water tariff, many Bangloreans are crying foul over quality of water being supplied by the water board.


Bangalore, Nov 4, 2014, DHNS:

While the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) has hiked the water tariff, many Bangloreans are crying foul over quality of water being supplied by the water board. For instance, the residents of DFL Layout, Srinivagilu at Koramangala are getting muddy water in their taps since August this year. Their memorandums to the BWSSB engineers has not yielded them any results so far.

M Krishnan, an affected resident, said “We suspected leakage in both drinking water pipeline and drainage line, and hence called the BWSSB officers to inspect the place. However, they maintained that there was no leakage and the problem remains unsolved. The Royale Paras Mark apartments, Aishwarya apartments and Shantidhama apartments in the locality are the worst affected.”

Residents rued that they spend Rs 600 every alternate day on private water tankers. Another resident, Suresh Babu, said that they also gave  samples of the contaminated water to the engineers but they remained adamant and apathetic. “They are not able to find out what the problem is. Why should we pay more when they are unable to provide proper service?,” added Babu.

Murali Krishna from Rajarajeshwari Nagar had to run from pillar to post for more than a month to get the meter at his home repaired. He said that the BWSSB engineers, whom he approached, were not cooperative and did not respond to his complaint. Similarly, Mahadevan, a resident from Mangammanapalya in Bommanahalli said that the BWSSB charged Rs 85,000 to repair the faulty meter at his apartment.

"The BWSSB said that the common meter at the apartment served so many flats and hence the cost would be high. The actual cost for repairing the meter is Rs 15,000," added Mahadevan. Meanwhile, the residents of Nagarbhavi II Stage, Link Road near Kodihalli, NR Layout in Murugeshpalya among others have complained about irregular supply of water despite taking cauvery water connection.

Engineer-in-chief T Venkataraju told Deccan Herald that he had not received any complaints from the residents of the DFL Layout regarding contaminated water. He added: "I will direct the engineers concerned to take action and respond to the people’s problems in their respective localities.

Article Source: http://www.deccanherald.com/content/439710/contaminated-tap-water-supplied-dlf.html
Publication Date: 04 Nov 2014

India - There is no suitable corrosion management and maintenance policy available to resolve corrosion growth and associated contamination issues reported for old water distribution

Our country is yet to find a corrosion management and maintenance policy suitable for resolving corrosion growth and associated contamination issues reported for old infrastructure. Present water quality monitoring does not cover the corrosion and material degradation concerns. Our water policy needs to be greatly modified to include these issues.

India - Water main burst near Reay Road railway station - Water supply to several areas in south Mumbai was affected

Integrity of century-old pipeline affected water supply to areas between Dadar and south Mumbai. The pipe burst has also badly damaged the road, only one lane was open for traffic on Sunday as the rest of the stretch was excavated. 


MUMBAI: A day after a water main burst near Reay Road railway station, water supply to several areas in south Mumbai was affected.

The century-old pipeline, which supplies water to areas between Dadar and south Mumbai, was repaired by Sunday evening, the affected areas—Sewri, Wadi Bunder, Dongri, Naval Dockyard, Mohammad Ali Road, Crawford Market, Lower Parel, JJ Hospital, Byculla and parts of Kalachowkie, Parel, Hindamata, Dadar (E)—will receive regular supply from Monday morning, said civic officials.

The pipe burst has also badly damaged the road, only one lane was open for traffic on Sunday as the rest of the stretch was excavated.

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/City/Mumbai/Reay-Road-pipeline-fixed-water-supply-will-be-restored-in-south-Mumbai-today-says-Brihanmumbai-Municipal-Corporation/articleshow/45016422.cms
Publication Date: 02 November 2014

Monday, October 6, 2014

CAPpings - India - Water Leakage and Contamination - Over 65 percentage houses in Kerala have no access to potable water

The district-wise analysis shows that the highest contamination is in Kozhikode as 55 per cent of tested sources indicated bacterial and chemical contamination and Idukki experiences the lowest level. Except Palakkad, the level of potable water is worsening in all other districts. The highest increase in quality affected district over previous year is Malappuram, where zero level of contamination was reported in 2012 and now 15 per cent of sources are contaminated. Kottayam and Kollam are also in a highly vulnerable position.

PALAKKAD: At a time when the state government is busy hiking the water tariff with a view to garner an additional tax of `260 crore, safe potable water remains out of reach for more than 65 per cent of the households in the state, says the report of the economic survey conducted by the Government of India.

The report also says that only 29.3 per cent of the houses in the state are serviced by tap water supply network. Of which, only 34 per cent gets safe water which is 52 per cent less than the national average, which is 86 percent and 57 and 59 per cent less than our neighbouring states Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, which are 91 per cent and 93 per cent respectively. The total urban population getting safe water has been reduced from 42.85 in 2001 to 39.4 per cent in 2011.

The district-wise analysis shows that the highest contamination is in Kozhikode as 55 per cent of tested sources indicated bacterial and chemical contamination and Idukki experiences the lowest level. Except Palakkad, the level of potable water is worsening in all other districts. The highest increase in quality affected district over previous year is Malappuram, where zero level of contamination was reported in 2012 and now 15 per cent of sources are contaminated. Kottayam and Kollam are also in a highly vulnerable position.

The situation is also worse in Kasargod. The people here get saline water through the pipes of Kerala Water Authority (KWA) during summer season. “The KWA supplies water from Chandragiri River. Saline water spills into the river sand, owing to storm surge, turning the water saline. The requests given to construct barrage across Chandragiri River to prevent saline water intrusion fell on deaf ears,” said environmentalist P Krishnan.

In Palakkad district, the people living in Muthalamada, Vadavathur, Elavanchery and Kollankod panchayats get muddy water through KWA pipes.

“It is from Meenkara dam we get potable water, but the dam has not been desilted for the last couple of decades. Hence, silt has been deposited at the bottom of the dam and people get water mixed with silt. A number of requests have been given in this regard but nothing has been done so far,” said Vandazhi panchayat president P V Krishnan.

Various drinking water projects implemented by the government have not been completed or is not in use now. Chakumkulam, Kuravlur, Tharoppadikal and Parakulam drinking water projects at places such as Kozhikode, Ponganpara drinking water project at Kottayam etc are some of the projects remaining uncompleted for years now.

In Kollam district, people living near Sasthamkotta Lake have been complaining  that they have been getting coloured potable water through the pipes, because of which they stopped using it.

“Now we buy water in can for potable purposes and for non potable purposes we buy water on wheels. We spend `3,000 per month just to meet our water needs,” said Kishore K K, a resident near Chakuvally.

Article Source: http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/kerala/%E2%80%98Over-65-Per-Cent-Houses-in-State-Have-No-Access-to-Potable-Water%E2%80%99/2014/10/06/article2463573.ece
Publication Date: 06October2014

CAPpings - India - Water Distribution - Loss of around 1.5 lakh litres of water daily through pipeline leaks leading to drinking water shortage in Kochi, Kerala

Loss of around 1.5 lakh litres of water daily through pipeline leaks. With the per capita requirement fixed by KWA at 150 litres, the loss of 1.5 lakh litres means that around 1,000 consumers are deprived of water due to the said leaks alone


KOCHI: After a long wait, the Kerala Water Authority (KWA) has started using SmartBall and Sahara technologies to detect leaks in the supply network. Initially, they have started inspecting the 42-inch pipeline, one among the three main pipelines that supply water to the city from KWA's treatment plant at Aluva, using the SmartBall technology.

When they completed a 5km stretch of the around 20km-long pipeline, three leaks were detected last week. Each leak results in a loss of 35 litres per minute. This translates into a loss of around 1.5 lakh litres of water daily through these leaks. With the per capita requirement fixed by KWA at 150 litres, the loss of 1.5 lakh litres means that around 1,000 consumers are deprived of water due to the said leaks alone.

Many parts of Kochi such as Fort Kochi, Mattancherry, Thevara, Cheranelloor and Vypeen islands are facing drinking water shortage even though the monsoon has not departed yet. "In Soorya Nagar, Maydina and Thevara colonies, residents went up in arms after they were made to wait for days for drinking water supply. The KWA would always cite one or the other reason for supply shortage," said Thevara division councilor Ranish P R.

In Fort Kochi and Mattancherry areas, chikungunya has become a major cause of worry after health officials found that water stored by local residents in vessels without covers had turned into breeding grounds for mosquitoes. The residents of west Kochi are forced to store water as the same is in short supply. The KWA will continue to conduct checks using SmartBall and Sahara technologies in the coming days. "We have found that water generated from our Aluva plant is not reaching many parts of Kochi. But we were not able to detect how water is lost in between. That's why we decided to introduce SmartBall and Sahara technologies," said KWA chief engineer A K Ramani.

According to KWA officials, they have always taken steps to plug leaks whenever such cases are reported to them. "There are problems in detecting leaks. There is a control room functioning round-the-clock to address complaints regarding leaks and pipe bursts. Once a problem is reported, we would soon deploy our maintenance contractors for repair works," insisted KWA superintending engineer Jolly Thomas.

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kochi/Too-many-holes-in-KWA-pipeline/articleshow/44535768.cms
Publication Date: 07 October 2014

Monday, September 15, 2014

CAPpings - India - Thousands of litres of drinking water are going down the drain due to a pipe burst on the main supply line, located along the Thane-Belapur Road at Digha, Navi Mumbai

Officials clueless about Thane-Belapur Road pipeline burst. Thousands of litres of drinking water are going down the drain due to a pipe burst on the main supply line, located along the Thane-Belapur Road at Digha, said residents. Local slum dwellers are queuing up to take home free potable water. Some motorists are washing their cars as well.



NAVI MUMBAI: Thousands of litres of drinking water are going down the drain due to a pipe burst on the main supply line, located along the Thane-Belapur Road at Digha, said residents. Local slum dwellers are queuing up to take home free potable water. Some motorists are washing their cars as well. Authorities are yet to plug the leakages or check water thefts happening for the past few weeks.

The leakages at many points are attributed to old pipes and handiwork of slum dwellers. "We are not doing anything wrong. We are only consuming the water that would otherwise go waste," said a slum dweller. This wastage leads to low pressure in supply in the vicinity, said a local, water bill paying consumer Ajit Bhavsar. When TOI asked MIDC officials about the pipe burst, Avinash Mali, deputy engineer, said "We have not come across the burst, as it might have happened recently. Our team will check for leakages, if any."

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/navi-mumbai/Officials-clueless-about-Thane-Belapur-Road-pipeline-burst/articleshow/42555608.cms
Publication Date: 16 September 2014

Sunday, September 14, 2014

CAPpings - India - Goa to replace 1000 km-long pipeline to curb non-revenue water

Goa government has announced augmentation of its water supply capacity and also replacement of an age old pipeline criss-crossing 1000-kilometre stretch in the state to reduce the quantum of non-revenue water


Panaji: Goa government has announced augmentation of its water supply capacity and also replacement of an age old pipeline criss-crossing 1000-kilometre stretch in the state to reduce the quantum of non-revenue water.

State Public Works Department Ministe told reporters here that the central government has given in principle go ahead for the ambitious project replacing the 1,000 km long pipeline at a cost of Rs 345 crore.

"The formal proposal would be placed before the union government?s committee during the meeting scheduled on September 25," Dhavalikar said.

The minister said that such a measure would reduce the quantum of non-revenue water, which is currently has reached alarming level of 40-50 per cent.

He said a special cell comprising 25 engineers has been assigned the job of curbing the percentage of non revenue water.

The Cell was formed three months back and we are sure that all the measures would help us to reduce the non revenue water (NRW) up to 20 per cent by next year, he said conceding that majority of revenue loses are created due to NRW.

Dhavalikar said the state government is working to provide round the clock water supply to all parts of Goa by December 2016, through the Japan agency funded project.

He said work on projects dealing with water augmentation will be complete by March 2015.

Article Source: http://zeenews.india.com/news/sci-tech/goa-to-replace-1000-km-long-pipeline-to-curb-non-revenue-water_1469215.html

Publication Date: 13 September 2014

CAPpings- India - Pipeline leakage induced contamination of drinking water supply in the districts of Amreli and Sabarkantha in Gujarat


Probable cause of disease outbreak was contamination of drinking water due to pipeline leakages.



Cases of vomiting and diarrhoea reported from Village Lunasapur, PHC - Nageshri Block Jafarabad, District Amreli. District RRT investigated the outbreak. Active search for cases done. Probable cause of outbreak was contamination of drinking water due to pipeline leakages. All cases treated symptomatically. Water samples sent to District Public Health Lab; result awaited. Chlorination of water sources done. Disinfection of surrounding done. IEC done regarding personal hygiene and safe drinking water.

Date of Observation: 11 August 2014

Cases of diarrhea reported from Village /SC Sabalpur, PHC Bolundra, Block Modasa, District Sabarkantha. District RRT investigated the outbreak. Active search for cases done. Probable cause of outbreak was contamination of drinking water due to pipeline leakage.
02 water sample sent to Microbiology Department, Himmatnagar Hospital; result awaited. Out of 10 stool sample tested 06 were positive for cholera. Chlorine tablets & ORS packets distributed. IEC done regarding personal hygiene and safe drinking water.

Date of Observation: 12 August 2014

Article Source: Integrated Disease Surveillance Project 

Friday, September 12, 2014

India - Severe pollution of potable water for the past two years in Indiranagar colony, Aurangabad Municipal Corporation (AMC) due to pipeline leakage induced sewer mixing

Around 300 residents claimed that they have been facing severe pollution of potable water for the past two years. They complained that they were being supplied with stinking water, contaminated with sewage because of leaking pipelines.



Indiranagar residents thirst for clean drinking water

AURANGABAD: Residents of Indiranagar colony, ward number 51, Baijipura, put up a protest on Friday against the Aurangabad Municipal Corporation (AMC), alleging that civic officials have failed to respond to their two-year-long demand of replacing old drinking water pipelines in the locality.

Around 300 residents claimed that they have been facing severe pollution of potable water for the past two years. They complained that they were being supplied with stinking water, contaminated with sewage because of leaking pipelines. Residents said that they had complained to the AMC many times about the dirty water supplied, but no action has been taken so far.

Bajipura is one of the few areas in Aurangabad facing complaints of a contaminated drinking water supply.

"We have been getting contaminated drinking water for the last two years. Though we took up the issue with AMC officials, no action has been taken. We registered our protests many times and took out a morcha to the ward office at Baijipura, but to no avail," said Salma Shaikh, a local resident.

With no proper piped drinking water supply, locals here depend on tankers and bore-wells. "Women find it very difficult to carry pots of water frequently up to the second or the third floor of their homes," Shaikh said.

"The drinking water supplied here is muddy and it stinks. I am on heavy medicines these days as a treatment of colitis, which I contracted consuming this water," said Aseefa Shale, another local.

Shale said many of her neighbours were also suffering from waterborne diseases. "In spite of reporting these issues to the AMC, officials have never taken any steps for our colony," said other residents.

"We have complained that we are getting water contaminated with sewage to corporator Kailash Gaikwad, but he has turned a blind eye towards this issue as well. He did not bother to visit our area even once to address our problem," said resident Salim Ullah.

Corporator Kailash Gaikwad could not be contacted.

"After we complained, AMC officials had collected water samples, but nothing has been done. The drainage and water supply pipelines are laid parallel and any breach in the pipelines allows mixing of dirty water with drinking water," said Syed Mobin.

AMC section engineer Arun More said, "We have been attending to the problem when we receive complaints. We have even fixed the leakages, but since these pipelines are very old, they need to be replaced."

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/aurangabad/Indiranagar-residents-thirst-for-clean-drinking-water/articleshow/42391785.cms
Publication Date: 13 September 2014

Monday, September 1, 2014

India - Surgery cancelled after pipe burst in Midnapore, West Bengal


Surgery cancelled after pipe burst in Midnapore, West Bengal



Midnapore: Surgeries in all the five operation theatres (OTs) in Midnapore Medical College (MMC) and Hospital scheduled beyond 8 am had to be cancelled on Friday after pipes supplying water there got choked.

Operations at the ENT, Eye, Orthopaedic surgical, General surgical and Emergency surgical OTs were cancelled as there was no supply of water.

The eight patients, who had skipped meals ahead of the surgeries, were taken to rest rooms adjoining the OTs.

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolkata/Surgeries-cancelled-after-pipe-burst/articleshow/39443171.cms
Publication Date: 02 August 2014

India - Mumbai Suffers 25% Water Cut After Pipe to Lake Bursts, PTI Says

Because the pipeline that supplies water to the city from Tansa Lake burst at Vartak Nagar, a 25 percent water cut was imposed in the western, eastern and southern parts of the city


Authorities in Mumbai, home to Bollywood stars and 12.5 million people, imposed an immediate 25 percent cut in city water supplies today when a pipeline from a lake ruptured, Press Trust of India said, citing the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai.

The Indian metropolis hopes to complete the repair work to one of seven lakes that supply water to the financial capital and restore full supplies by tomorrow night.

Because the pipeline that supplies water to the city from Tansa Lake burst at Vartak Nagar, a 25 percent water cut was imposed in the western, eastern and southern parts of the city, Deputy Municipal Commissioner Ramesh Bambale told PTI. The agency five days earlier ceased water cuts imposed on July 3 on Mumbai due to poor June rainfall that had been halved to 10 percent on July 30 after a downpour.

Article Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-08-18/mumbai-suffers-25-water-cut-after-pipe-to-lake-bursts-pti-says.html
Publication Date: 17 August 2014

India - CAPpings- Water pipeline leakages across Mumbai went up by 20% in 5 Years

While 25,123 leakages were detected in 2009, the number has risen to 30,100 till October 2013. Water pipeline leakages across Mumbai went up by 20% in 5 Years


If the data obtained from the hydraulic department is anything to go by, the number of visible leakages detected in the water pipelines across the city has increased by 20% in the past five years.

While 25,123 leakages were detected in 2009, the number has risen to 30,100 till October 2013. The figures, however, do not account for the leakages of underground pipelines, which flow directly into the nullahs and sewer lines, as the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has no mechanism to identify them.

Officials claim that the number does not equate to the amount of water lost. “Even a minor dripping leak and a major pipeline burst are counted as leakages. The increase in the number of leakages does not mean that an increasing quantity of water is being lost,” said an official from the hydraulic engineer’s department, on condition of anonymity as he is not authorised to speak to the media.

Experts claim the civic body has failed in bridging the gap between the demand and supply of water in the city. Citing the Rs2,207-crore Middle Vaitarna dam project as a case in point, Nitai Mehta, managing trustee of Praja Foundation, said, “While hundreds of crores of rupees are spent on increasing the capacity of water supply sources, the cost-effective measures that could help plug leakages in the distribution system are ignored”.

The Praja Foundation, in its white paper, released in April had stated how there had been a 60% rise in the number of water supply-related complaints such as leakages, water shortage and contamination, between 2011 and 2012.

Several projects planned by the civic body to improve the distribution network have been pending for years with little or no progress.

“The leakages in the distribution system could have an adverse impact on people’s health. Areas in island city such as Byculla, Tardeo, Girgaum are the worst affected because of the old water pipelines,” said Mehta.

Article Source: http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/mumbai/in-5-years-water-pipeline-leakages-across-mumbai-went-up-by-20/article1-1156980.aspx
Publication Date: 29 November 2013

Friday, August 22, 2014

CAPpings - US and Canada - 1.5 Million Solar-Panel Systems recalled Over Corrosion Problem that paves the way for possible electric shock, electrocution or fire hazard

Solar panels installed with bare-copper grounding lugs can corrode. This may result in a faulty ground circuit, which could pose the potential hazards. The lugs are brown in color.



SolarWorld recalls 1.5M systems for possible electric shock, electrocution or fire hazard

WASHINGTON –  SolarWorld is recalling approximately 1.5 million of its systems due to a possible electric shock, electrocution or fire hazard.

The company said Thursday that solar panels installed with bare-copper grounding lugs can corrode. This may result in a faulty ground circuit, which could pose the potential hazards. The lugs are brown in color.

SolarWorld said that it has received one report of corrosion related to the bare copper lugs. No injuries have been reported.

The company is recalling about 1.3 million systems in the U.S. and 210,000 in Canada. The systems were sold by SolarWorld installers and distributors and other distribution companies from June 2011 to June 2014. They were priced between about $1,000 and $10,000, depending on the system's size.

The systems included in the recall were installed after June 1, 2010. The installation instructions for SolarWorld systems sold after June 1, 2010 called for the use of GBL-4DB lugs for grounding. SolarWorld has revised the instructions to require tin-coated lugs, specifically Ilsco part number GBL-4DBT. "T'' is for tin-coated and indicated by the silver color of the lug.

Consumers who can identify the improper lugs should contact SolarWorld for replacement. Those who can't properly identify the lugs should contact SolarWorld to have an authorized company agent inspect the installation and replace the lugs with tin-coated grounding lugs or an equally safe alternative for free.

SolarWorld is requesting that distributors and others remove its installation instructions dated before June 2014 from their websites or other commercial information sources.

Consumers can call SolarWorld toll-free at (877) 360-1787 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. PT Monday through Friday. The company can also be reached online at www.solarworld-usa.com , where you can click on the "Product Safety" tab for more information.

Article Source: http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2014/08/21/solarworld-recalls-15m-systems-for-possible-electric-shock-electrocution-or/
Publication Date: 21 August 2014

CAPpings-India - The Petroleum Ministry has blamed negligence for causing the devastating fire at state-owned gas transporter GAIL India Ltd's gas pipeline in Andhra Pradesh that killed 22 people

The Petroleum Ministry has blamed negligence for causing the devastating fire at state-owned gas transporter GAIL India Ltd's gas pipeline in Andhra Pradesh that killed 22 people.



An inquiry committee, headed by Joint Secretary (Refineries) Rajesh Kumar Singh, in a report submitted last week concluded that negligence caused the fire at the Tatipaka-Kondapalli pipeline on June 27.

Sources said the committee found that the pipeline had corroded due to condensate and water that came along with the natural gas from an Oil and Natural Gas Corp (ONGC) field.

Water corroded bottom of the pipeline, causing pores in the underground pipeline. Gas was being transported at high pressure and it leaked along with flammable condensate leaked out to the surface on the night of June 26/27. Overcast weather lead to a cloud of gas being formed even as condensate sprayed on the ground.

A spark, possibly from a cigarette or bidi lit by a local, at 0545 hours on June 27 led to condensate and cloud of gas catching fire with a loud explosion.

The other source of the massive fire is being mentioned as a tea vendor lighting up a stove in the vicinity of the leak, scorching everything in a radius of about half a km, including houses and vehicles, in Nagaram village of East Godavari district.

The exact source may not known as everything including the persons were charred, sources said.

Sources said gas should have been stripped of waste and condensate at GAIL's Nagaram facility before being pumped into the pipeline for transportation to a power plant.

The gas sales and purchase agreement between ONGC and GAIL has no mention about the quality of gas. ONGC believes stripping of gas was GAIL's responsibility while the gas utility feels otherwise.

Sources said following the accident, GAIL has decided to put separators at gas sources in the Krishna Godavari, Cauvery and Cambay basin. GAIL has reduced pressure at pipelines in Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Gujarat and is carrying out thorough checks.

Any pipeline which is found to have been corroded or is more than 15 years old is being replaced.

Following the accident, GAIL has suspended officials responsible for the safety of the pipeline passing through the populated area. It suspended General Manager Pankaj Patel and Deputy General Manager Rakesh Kumar.

"Pending the outcome of the inquiry set up by the government as well as the company, two senior officials in charge of regional operations and maintenance of the pipeline network have been suspended," GAIL had said in a statement on June 29.

Under a 2006 agreement between ONGC and GAIL, the latter is responsible for removing condensate and water, which corrode the pipeline because of high presence of sulphur.

The 18-inch pipeline carried gas from state-owned ONGC's gas field in the East Godavari district.

Article Source: http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/oilmin-says-negligence-caused-fire-at-gail-pipeline-in-andhra-114081700163_1.html
Publication Date: 17 August 2014

Water Rust to Water TRUST News Feed - India to observe 2015-2016 as Water Conservation Year: Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation Minister Uma Bharti

India to observe 2015-2016 as Water Conservation Year: Uma Bharti, Minister for Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation. The minister appealed to every section of the society to join this movement. 


The year 2015-16 will be observed as water conservation year and a public movement will be launched during the year to conserve the precious resource, Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation Minister Uma Bharti said on Wednesday.

The minister said the cooperation of state governments, NGOs, civil society, youth and retired personnel will be taken in this task.

She said, public movement has become a necessity for conservation of water and river in the country as it is an important element of development and at some places the sacred water of the River Ganga is not even fit for consumption by animals.

Referring to the apprehensions raised by some sections on the viability of inter-linking of rivers in the country, Bharti said, "we will ensure that environment, aqua life of rivers and eco-balance is not disturbed in the process."

She said her government is committed to the inter-linking of rivers as it will ensure equitable distribution of river water in the country and proposes to fulfill this task within ten years.

The minister also referred to the criticisms made in a section of the media about the efforts to locate the extinct Saraswati River and said that there is no religious feeling behind this. In fact, this will help us to locate the water reservoirs en-route which can be utilized for irrigation, the Minister added.

Expressing concern over the pollution in river Yamuna in Delhi, the Minister said her Ministry will give full cooperation to Government of NCT Delhi in making Yamuna pollution free. She informed that she will be taking a meeting in this regard within a day or two.

Referring to the Ganga Rejuvenation Programme, the minister said whole country is united on this issue. She said Government will ensure that Ganga is pollution free and flows uninterrupted. She said "We will ensure that within a period of three years Ganga is free of most of its pollution and at least on stream of Ganga flows uninterrupted."

The minister appealed to every section of the society to join this movement.

Article Source: http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ani/india-to-observe-2015-2016-as-water-conservation-year-uma-bharti-114082001056_1.html
Publication Date: 20 August 2014

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

India - Water of life - Cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar opined that there is no provision of reviewing drinking water quality at both source and supply levels - Corrosion control community expects him to include awareness for corrosion in his campaign

There is no provision of reviewing drinking water quality at both source and supply levels. In developed countries, the water quality of the source reservoir is reviewed every month and the results are sent to each resident. I request that this should be done in India, too, to ensure that the quality of potable water is maintained. Additionally, water quality testing labs at block level should also be there. In urban areas, mobile testing laboratories can provide easy access to people.


Sachin Tendulkar discusses safe drinking water

Bharat Ratna recipient and cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar in association with Livpure Foundation recently launched “Shuddh Paani Swastha Bharat”, a movement aiming to lower the mortality rate among children under five due to waterborne diseases. According to the National Health Care Survey 2013 less than one-third of Indian households have access to purified drinking water. The ace batsman spoke to the Metroplus about his concern about this and other health-related issues.

Excerpts from the interview:

How do you feel connected to the cause of eradication of water borne diseases?

There are several children aged under five who are affected by diseases caused by impure water. Not only their health is affected, many lives are lost as well. Access to safe drinking water is a basic human right and this is the reason why I got associated with Shudh Pani, Swastha Bharat campaign.

How is Sachin as a brand ambassador going to work for this campaign?

Sachin as a brand ambassador can always propagate the message to his fans, followers and media. But it’s not an initiative that requires a few individuals to push. I think this will require a mega effort by the entire nation. I always want to be there to create awareness. I think once you start creating awareness the next steps follow automatically.

What suggestion would you give to the concerned authorities, including the Government to provide on access to clean drinking water for all?

There is no provision of reviewing drinking water quality at both source and supply levels. In developed countries, the water quality of the source reservoir is reviewed every month and the results are sent to each resident. I request that this should be done in India, too, to ensure that the quality of potable water is maintained. Additionally, water quality testing labs at block level should also be there. In urban areas, mobile testing laboratories can provide easy access to people.

How effective do you think is the medium of campaign to support a cause?

For water borne diseases, campaigns are required because of water contamination in the country. Since, we cannot directly impose an external cause-based model in the nation, we need to come up with campaigns that develop need-based models of sanitisation that are suitable in low-income environment.

You are UNICEF’s brand ambassador for hygiene. Do you find your role in this campaign interlinked with it?

Yes it is linked because both of them involve children. As the UNICEF ambassador, I have spent time with children in remote places that are not easily accessible and taught them cleanliness and certain level of hygiene like how to wash their hands. In this campaign, we have school children playing a really important part. Under the Student Health Ambassador Programme, selected school students would be trained to check the water for bacterial contamination with a small kit provided to them. If its impure they will report it to the concerned authorities.

Article Source: http://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/sachin-tendulkar-discusses-safe-drinking-water/article6324211.ece
Publication Date: 17 August 2014

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Electronic Gadgets - Corrosion irritates LG G Smart Watch users - An OTA Software update issued by LG to Prevent Terminal Pin Corrosion

Corrosion of Terminal Pins irritates LG G Smart Watch users.  An OTA software update issued to stop corrosion. Seems strange, but it is pretty much possible. LG’s G Watch users have complained of irritation on the skin where the watch touches the body.


LG has started rolling-out a software update for the G Watch to prevent the corrosion problem seen on the smartwatch's backside-charging pins.

 

Revealed at the Google I/O event, the LG G Watch continuously streams current to the backside-located charging pins, even when the device is not charging. These current-filled pins, when exposed to sweat-covered skin, get corroded. The new update however, will stop the continuous streaming of the current to the G Watch's charging pins when not charging.

"Recently it has come to our attention that a small number of G Watch devices have been reported to have developed discoloration and residue buildup on the terminal pins located on the back. While completely safe and unlikely to affect charging, LG will be rolling out a maintenance release over the next few days that will disable the current when the G Watch is not in the charging dock. The maintenance release will be rolled out automatically over-the-air to all G Watch owners. We thank G Watch users for their patience and apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused," LG support told an affected user, and explanation corroborated by Google to Android Police.

Article Source: http://gadgets.ndtv.com/wearables/news/lg-issues-software-update-for-g-watch-to-prevent-terminal-pin-corrosion-570460
Publication Date: 04 August 2014

Monday, August 4, 2014

India - Water Pipeline Leakage - Rajajipuram in Lucknow getting contaminated drinking water - Old sewer lines run close to water pipelines

The area is densely populated and has very old sewer lines which run close to water pipelines. These pipelines are in extremely bad condition as a result of which sewage content frequently mixes with the water supply.


Rajajipuram getting contaminated drinking water

LUCKNOW: Residents of Rajajipuram are facing the problem of contaminated water supply for past many days. The residents of five wards -- Kunwar Jyoti Prasad I, Kunwar Jyoti Prasad II, Hardeen Rai Nagar, Labour Colony and Rajajipuram Housing ? have complained about scanty and dirty water supply but with no results.

Shiv Pal Sawariya, corporator of Rajajipuram ward said, "Blocks F and D have been receiving contaminated water supply since last 20 days. Use of plastic pipes instead of galvanized iron ones to save on connection cost is the major reason behind this problem". The plastic pipes are risky as they wither away with time, allowing mud and sewage to seep in and mix with the water supply, he added.

The area is densely populated and has very old sewer lines which run close to water pipelines. These pipelines are in extremely bad condition as a result of which sewage content frequently mixes with the water supply. "Sewer lines should ideally be changed every 30 years but in Rajajipuram, they are more than 40 years old." said a resident.

Jitendra Upadhyay, another resident said, "When I requested Lucknow Municipal Corporation to change the pipelines, I got the same old excuse of lack of funds." Bhavya Puram area of Block A has not received water for the last 8 days. Problems related to water shortage and dissolved impurities in drinking water supply are enormously increasing in various localities of Rajajipuram, he added .

The entire area is having around 1000 hand pumps but unfortunately 80% of them are not working. Re-boring and repairing is a major challenge for corporators here. Jal Nigam is supposed to handle the work of re-boring, but often, they delay the work and wants government's approval for funds.

People have been fighting to get water for drinking purpose and other household chores. The locals also fear that water borne diseases are likely to spread under such conditions.

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/lucknow/Rajajipuram-getting-contaminated-drinking-water/articleshow/39445270.cms
Publication Date: 02 August 2014

Monday, July 14, 2014

CAPpings- India - Water Pipeline Leakage in Andhra - nearly 5 to 7 million gallons per day of water is wasted in Visakhapatnam - leakages mostly occur at junctions where pipelines intersect with drainage canals

Leaking pipes pose health hazards. Wastage of nearly 5 to 7 million gallons per day of water of the total Greater Visakhapatnam Municipal Corporation (GVMC) supply of nearly 65-67 mgd. Most of the complainants allege that the leakages mostly occur at junctions where pipelines intersect with drainage canals


VISAKHAPATNAM: After the initial euphoria about the southwest monsoon finally making its arrival, Vizagites are now worried about the quality of drinking water being supplied by the Greater Visakhapatnam Municipal Corporation (GVMC). All thanks to rampant leakages in the GVMC pipelines posing health hazards due to mixing of sewage and rain water with drinking water along the pipeline network.

In fact, TOI spotted a leaking GVMC water supply pipeline, leading into a drainage canal, at Siripuram Junction. This apart, there are several complaints filed by residents of areas like Jagadamba Centre and Poorna Market in the Old City, Maharanipeta, AVN College, HB Colony, Pedagantyada, Kancharapalem, Gopalapatnam, Sivajipalem and Pithapuram Colony about leaking pipes to the GVMC. In fact, most of the complainants allege that the leakages mostly occur at junctions where pipelines intersect with drainage canals

One such complainant is Vizag Steel Plant employee K Ramesh, who lodged a plaint with GVMC about a leaking pipeline in Pedagantyada area where he resides. "I brought the water leakage issue to the attention of the GVMC commissioner through a complaint on July 8, but there has been no response from him till date. We are worried that this leakage may result in contamination of tap water due to mixing of rain water," he said.

Meanwhile, GVMC superintending engineer (water works), D Mariyanna said leakages were resulting in a wastage of nearly 5-7 million gallons per day of water of the total GVMC supply of nearly 65-67 mgd to meet the demands of 66 bulk, 3,200 semi-bulk and 2 lakh general tap connection holders in the city, including Anakapalle and Bheemili. "GVMC has to invest about Rs 17,000 per day to procure one MGD of water," Mariyanna added.

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/visakhapatnam/Leaking-pipes-pose-health-hazards/articleshow/38307763.cms
Publication Date: 13 July 2014

Thursday, July 3, 2014

CAPpings - India - GAIL Gas Pipeline Accident in Andhra Pradesh – Ignorance of corrosion issues is leading the way for hefty and irreparable human, flora and fauna losses

A gas pipeline explosion and fire at Nagaram village in Andhra Pradesh early Friday on 27 June 2014 has claimed 15 lives and injured many others. A number of birds built their nests on a Neem tree in the marketyard which now wears a ghostly look, with empty nests. According to municipal workers who removed the carcasses, more than 200 birds may have perished in the fire. 




Image Courtesy: The Hindu and New Indian Express
Image Source links: http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/andhra_pradesh/GAIL-Blames-Oil-Majors-for-Pipeline-Blast/2014/06/30/article2307532.ece
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http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/andhra-pradesh/gas-pipeline-blast-avians-too-prerish/article6160225.ece?ref=slideshow#im-image-0

Friday, June 20, 2014

UK - Corrosion Research - Human sweat can reduce anti-bacterial properties of brass objects (door handles and water taps) in hospitals, schools and public buildings

Human sweat can reduce the effectiveness of bacteria-fighting brass objects in hospitals and schools after just an hour of coming into contact with them

Human sweat can reduce the effectiveness of bacteria-fighting brass objects in hospitals and schools after just an hour of coming into contact with them, according to a new study. University of Leicester researchers discovered that sweat can cause corrosion of protective qualities of door knobs and taps within an hour of contact.
Copper found in everyday brass items such as door handles and water taps has an antimicrobial effect on bacteria and is widely used to prevent the spread of disease. Dr John Bond from the University of Leicester's Department of Chemistry found that peoples' sweat can, within an hour of contact with the brass, produce sufficient corrosion to adversely affect its use to kill a range of microorganisms, such as those which might be encountered in a hospital and which can be easily transferred by touch or by a lack of hand hygiene.
"The antimicrobial effect of copper has been known for hundreds of years. It is thought to occur as a result of a charge exchange between copper and bacteria, which leads to a degradation of the bacteria DNA," Bond said. "We have discovered that the salt in sweat corrodes the metal, forming an oxide layer on its surface, which is the process of corrosion - and this corrosive layer is known to inhibit the effect of the copper.
"We have shown that it is possible for sweat to produce an oxide layer on the metal within an hour of contact," Bond said. "While it is well known that sweat corrodes brass, this is the first study to quantitatively analyse the temporal corrosion of copper alloys such as brass in the first few hours after contact between fingerprint sweat concentrations of salt and the metal," he said.
"My short term advice is to keep the brass in public environments free from corrosion through regular and thorough cleaning. In the longer term, using copper alloys with corrosion inhibitors included in the alloy would be a good choice," Bond said.
"While more research is needed in the study of sweat and brass corrosion, anywhere that needs to prevent the spread of bacteria, such as public buildings, schools and hospitals should be looking at using copper alloy on everyday items to help in avoiding the spread of disease," he said.
Publication Date: 18 June 2014

India - Water Distribution - Pipe Leak Irks Residents in Aluva region, Kerala - Everyday over 25,000 litres of water is wasted


Everyday, over 25,000 litres of water is wasted. This is a criminal offence considering the fact that we are facing acute potable water scarcity. For over five years, the pipe has been lying in a poor condition. 


ALUVA:  At a time when abysmal water scarcity looms large, the KWA’s apathy to fix a water pipeline leak here has left the local residents seething with rage.

Residents and environmental activists in Thottumugham in Keezhmadu panchayat here have been  complaining about a huge leak in one of the pipes that supply potable water to the entire area. The leak has been detected in the pipe passing under the bridge in Thottumugham.

“For over five years, the pipe has been lying in a poor condition. After receiving repeated complaints, the KWA officials did some patch work on the steel pipe a few years ago, but failed to stop the water leakage,” environmental activist Seetharaman said.

“Everyday, over 25,000 litres of water is wasted. This is a criminal offence considering the fact that we are facing acute potable water scarcity,” he said. The residents have made repeated complaints to KWA executive engineer, panchayat officials, the District Collector and the local MLA. But no one has responded or made any effort to address this grave issue, resident and activist Kareem Kallungal has said.

KWA executive engineer E Nandakumar told ‘Express’  that KWA is aware of the situation.“There is a leak in one of the pipes. We have been trying to repair it. But we are yet to complete the work. The repair work would require around `10 lakh. But our approved estimate only amounts to `6 lakh. We had invited open tender, but contractors refuse to take up the work for this amount,” he said.

Article Source: http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/kerala/Pipe-Leak-Irks-Residents/2014/06/08/article2268751.ece
Publication Date: 08 June 2014

Monday, May 5, 2014

Australia - Sewer Corrosion - Bringing science to the sewers, a collaborative research work of five research and 11 industry partners coordinated by Advanced Water Management Centre, University of Queensland

It is a smelly problem with serious financial and environmental consequences. But a University of Queensland-led research project could spell the end for stinky sewers. And by dispelling the smell, researchers have cut down on the major cause of sewer corrosion, saving councils and utility companies hundreds of millions of dollars.

Led over five years by Professor Zhiguo Yuan from UQ's Advanced Water Management Centre and involving five research and 11 industry partners, including engineers, microbiologists, material scientists, analytical chemists and mathematical modellers, the team have won the 2014 International Water Association Asia Pacific Regional Project Innovation Award for applied research. While the generation of hydrogen sulphide was known to be a major cause of odour and corrosion, dealing with it was another matter. Which is why engagement and business development manager for the UQ Advanced Water Management Centre, Sandra Hall, said it was necessary to bring “science to the sewers”.

“It was about knowledge generation in the beginning, and understanding the problem,” Dr Hall said. “Once they understood the problem, it was about applying logic and reason and coming up with a solution.“What UQ has also done is develop tools and computer models so that utilities and asset owners can monitor what is happening in their sewers and be able to apply those chemicals that they used to reduce bio films and odour corrosion problems in the right place at the right time, so that it makes the process more efficient, more effective for the asset owner.

Article Source: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/bringing-science-to-the-sewers-20140427-37bum.html
Publication Date: 27April2014

Thursday, May 1, 2014

India - Water Contamination - Schoolkids on Guwahati fringes drink acidic water

GUWAHATI: In an alarming find, the state public health and engineering department (PHED) and an NGO said schoolchildren in the tribal belt along the outskirts of the city have been consuming water, which is highly acidic in nature and unfit for drinking. The source of the water for these children is a well.

A little over five per cent of the samples were found to contain iron above the permissible limit of 0.3 mg/l. The survey pointed out that long time consumption of water with a high concentration of iron could lead to liver diseases. The test was conducted to ascertain the availability of pure drinking water to the students in the Rani-Deepor Beel-Gorchuk belt bordering Meghalaya by NGO Eco Concept in collaboration with PHED.

Apart from the high pH value, the survey also found the levels of hardness, turbidity, residual chlorine, iron and bacteria high in the water. Of the 1,052 water samples tested across 129 villages, 202 or 19.20% were found to have pH above 7 while 33 samples or 3.13% had pH above 8.5 limits, which is considered unsuitable for drinking. "The pH value is a measure of the intensity of alkali or acid in water. A high value of pH hastens scale formation in water-heating apparatus and reduces the germicidal potential of chlorine. A pH level below 6.5 leads to corrosion in pipes thereby releasing toxic metals," the report said. Only 549 samples or 52.18% of the total samples were found to have pH levels within permissible limits of 6.5 to 8.5 pH. Absolutely pure water has a pH value of 7.0.

Four different schools were selected for the tests on different days. The samples were taken to the school by students from their homes. Free chlorine concentration (0.1-0.4 ppm) is usually maintained in municipal water. Only 222 samples tested had free chlorine concentration. Use of proper chemicals in the water source can improve the quantity of free chlorine concentration in water, which is essential for good health.

On the other hand, 90 samples had a turbidity range of 10 Nephelometric Turbidity Unit and 56 samples had turbidity of 25 NTU. The report said samples above 10 NTU should be filtered before consumption. Samples in 96 containers tested positive for bacterial contamination. Gorchuk had the highest number of samples testing positive for bacterial contamination followed by Pamohi.

Article Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/City/Guwahati/Schoolkids-on-Guwahati-fringes-drink-acidic-water/articleshow/34410148.cms
Publication Date: 30 April 2014


Sunday, April 20, 2014

India - Water Distribution - 60 per cent rural homes get contaminated water - Awareness for corrosion issues leading to contamination is very limited in our country

60 per cent rural homes get contaminated water: report


Over 41 per cent of urban households and 60 per cent of rural households with access to safe water get contaminated water, a report published in the British medical journal, The Lancet, has said.

Although 99.6 per cent of urban and over 97 per cent of rural households surveyed had access to safe water, as defined by the United Nations Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target 7c indicator, water was contaminated in 41.5 per cent (284 of 685) of urban and 60 per cent (715 of 1,191) of rural households, the study said.

Similar water quality results were found in a previous study of eight Indian districts, says the latest Lancet study, “MDG 7c for safe drinking water in India: an illusive achievement,” authored by Mira Joshi, Dinesh Chandra, S.V.Subramanian, Maria-Pierre Sylvestre and Smriti Pahwa.

The MDG target 7c aims to halve the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. With 89 per cent coverage globally and 91 per cent coverage in India in 2011, the U.N. monitoring bodies judge the world to be on track for access to drinking water.

“However, the celebration might be premature. The MDG target 7c indicator does not consider water quality, which relates to pathogens and chemicals that can cause disease,” the study says.

Article Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/60-per-cent-rural-homes-get-contaminated-water-report/article5927267.ece
Publication Date: 19 April 2014

Sunday, March 23, 2014

India - World Water Day 2014 - Why water is a business issue, an opinion posted in Business Line

The world is getting thirstier and so is India. Many causes of increased demand are common at both the global and national level; increasing population, rapid industrialisation, higher standards of living to name a few. The only thing not increasing commensurately is the amount of water available.

The UN Water Conference held in January this year delved into the water-energy nexus and portended that world water demand could exceed 44 per cent of the available annual resources by 2050. So how do these global trends look through the prism of the Indian experience?

At the national level the challenges are acknowledged. Writing about the Twelfth Plan’s water strategy, Planning Commission member Mihir Shah commented, “India faces a major crisis of water ... The demands of a rapidly industrialising economy and urbanising society come at a time when the potential for augmenting supply is limited, water tables are falling and water quality issues have increasingly come to the fore.”

On the table

One consequence, here and elsewhere, is that water is moving up the boardroom agenda. The CDP Global Water Report 2014, authored by Deloitte, presents results of analysis based on the water disclosures of 184 Global 500 corporations. Participants included four major Indian companies. Almost three-quarters of respondents identified water as a substantive business risk. Challenges included business interruption due to inadequate public infrastructure, supply chain disruption due to water scarcity, and reputational damage.

Water risk was seen as immediate. Two-thirds of the risks expected to impact direct operations and supply chains were anticipated to occur within the next five years. To give this local perspective, it is estimated that India has seen a 60 per cent decline in per capita availability of water in the last 50 years; while Ernst & Young predicts industry’s demand for water will grow from 40.86 billion cubic metres (Bm3) in 2010 to 91.63Bm3 in 2030.

Article Source: http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/opinion/why-water-is-a-business-issue/article5815518.ece
Publication Date: 21 March 2014

Friday, March 7, 2014

CAPpings - Electronic Corrosion - Mobile Phone Charger Cable - Lightning cables used for iPhone failing due to corrosion

User experience reported in http://www.zdnet.com/lightning-cables-failing-due-to-corrosion-7000026982/

About a month ago the Apple Lightning to USB cable that I keep in my vehicle for charging my iPhone 5s began to fail. At first charging was intermittent, then within a week the cable wouldn't charge my iPhone at all. A closer look at the male end of the Apple Lightning to USB cable reveals that several of the gold contacts have become corroded. 

Sunday, March 2, 2014

CAPpings - India - Water analysis data to be monitored in Chennai - More efforts should be taken on analysing the sources for corrosion failures

Water quality to be monitored in pipelines

Residents need not wait much longer to figure out the source of their contaminated Metrowater supply. In a month, Chennai Metrowater will fix monitoring devices in the pipeline to frequently check the quality supplied to city.

The water agency will install the equipment in 50 locations across Chennai and introduce automated inline water quality monitoring system. At present, Metrowater staff members manually collect over 3,500 water samples daily from various places, including distribution points and pipelines at consumers’ end. They check the residual chlorine level and the results are communicated to the area offices concerned.

Once the GSM/GPRS - enabled devices are fitted in the pipeline, they would collect water samples automatically, test quality for three parameters — residual chlorine content, Ph value and turbidity — and transmit data to the centralised monitoring room in Metrowater's head office in Chintadripet, said officials. The water agency has identified over 200 locations so far and will shortlist 50 spots, near homes or water distribution stations to fix the equipment, comprising analysers and GSM modem.

The sensors in the equipment will communicate the data about the samples tested whenever water is supplied through the pipeline. The drinking water pipelines run for over 5,200 km across the city and it often takes time to identify how and where the contamination occurs.

Officials said that as the data would be transmitted along with time and location, it would be easy to identify the source of problem and rectify it immediately. The system would send an alert about the water quality through mobile text messages to officials concerned and technicians.

After the system is in place, staff members need not wait for residents’ complaints about any contamination or results from the laboratory to initiate action on water-related problems. Uninterrupted power supply facility would also be ensured for continuous flow of data from the system, an official added.

Metrowater will, continue to collect and test water samples manually.

Article Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/chennai/water-quality-to-be-monitored-in-pipelines/article5730196.ece
Publication Date: 26 Feb 2014

CAPpings - India - IT Major IBM's hi-tech solution to plug water leakage, pegged at 45 per cent of the supply, in Bangalore

BANGALORE: IT major IBM has come to the rescue of Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) to plug water leakage in the city, pegged at 45 per cent of the supply.

The board, in association with the company, has set up a command centre to monitor and manage the water supply system.

The centre monitors water flow in 284 of the 784 bulk flow meters and reservoirs, providing a clear view of the amount of water transmitted by each, the amount supplied to individual parts of the distribution system and the level of water in each reservoir. Data from every meter is displayed on a dashboard, which can be accessed by BWSSB engineers.


Publication Date: 21 Feb 2014

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

CAPpings- India - Clean Drinking Water Can Save Lives -- Through Water Education

Can education save the one out of every five children in India who die before the age of 5 from infections caused by dirty water? I believe it can, and I believe India's 500 million children are the ones who can and must lead the transformation in hygiene practices that can save these lives and help address the nation's water crisis.
What really brought this home to me was a recent two-week service trip to India in the company of Jacqueline Lundquist, the Chief Serendipity Officer at WaterHealth International who knows India and its people and culture very well. The wife of former U.S. Ambassador under President Clinton, Richard Celeste, Lundquist lived in India from 1997 to 2001, and her heart and her work bring her back there frequently. Her latest initiative, the Jaldhaara Foundation (jaldhaara means "flowing water" in Hindi) was launched on Jan. 3, 2014, in a rural village 45 kilometers south of Hyderabad, under the sponsorship of WaterHealth corporate leadership.
Publication Date: 17 January 2014