Sunday, March 27, 2016

India - Water Infrastructure - The water link to job creation. Our Viewpoint: Corrosion awareness among the utility designers and water management authorities is very limited. There is a great need for employing corrosion management professionals

Globally, more than 600 million people do not use drinking water from improved sources, and about 2.4 billion people lack basic sanitation. In India, due to lack of access of water and improved sanitation, 73 million work days are lost each year. In non-notified slum areas, households are generally deprived of improved water sources, and more than 50 per cent of such households are without improved access of sanitation (against 17 per cent in notified slums).

Our Viewpoint: Time has come to create more job opportunities in water infrastructure as quoted by the author. Our country is loosing significant percentage of water through leakages. India has a mixed bag of old assets and new installations for water transmission and distribution. When any leakage occurs, the immediate reaction from the water management authorities is to quote the pipeline age and find temporary corrective measures. It is not an easy task to replace the failed systems with all brand new assets. Huge investment is involved in this process. Corrosion of materials is one of the leading causes for water pipeline leakage and contamination. Utility management has the misconception of using corrosion induced pipeline weak spots as pressure relieving points to maintain the pressure within the distribution network. There are numerous cases of water contamination with sewage encountered at the present time for a great bunch of drinking water pipelines laid very close to the sewage transmission. Frequent leakages indicate that the materials were not properly selected and no comprehensive corrosion control program is in place. Simple selection of materials based on the current practices followed for other projects does not solve the purpose. Specific testing and life cycle analysis have to be carried out to find cost-effective material answers. It is difficult to find the installation of proven materials and associated corrosion control measures that minimize the maintenance load and assure the integrity of assets. Corrosion awareness among the utility designers and water management authorities is very limited. Now is the time to learn from failures and create job opportunities for filling the gaps in the design, operation and maintenance of water distribution networks. We need to turn Water Rust to Water TRUST.
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The water link to job creation
SK Sarkar | 07 March, 2016

Every year across the world in the month of March, the World Water Day (WWD) is observed with an aim to focus attention on the importance of fresh water and advocating sustainable management of water resources. On March 22 this year, the global community will observe WWD on a theme captioned ‘water and jobs’. Can enough quantity and quality of water change workers’ lives and livelihood, and even transform societies and economies?
What kind of linkages exist between water and jobs? Globally, more than 600 million people do not use drinking water from improved sources, and about 2.4 billion people lack basic sanitation. In India, due to lack of access of water and improved sanitation, 73 million work days are lost each year. In non-notified slum areas, households are generally deprived of improved water sources, and more than 50 per cent of such households are without improved access of sanitation (against 17 per cent in notified slums).
This has resulted in India falling into the category of the highest open defecators in the world. The adverse health implication arising out of this situation has affected our labour productivity and has had a consequent impact on higher economic growth and job creation.
A healthy work force is required for any high-growth economy, which is sustainable in an environment where there is access to clean water infrastructure and improved sanitation for every person. The human right to water and sanitation, as adopted by the UN General Assembly (2010), entitles everyone to sufficient, safe, acceptable, physically accessible and affordable water for personal and domestic use.
This along with improved sanitation catalyses a country’s high economic growth. Over the world, more than half of the workers (about 1.5 billion) are engaged in jobs related to water and those that ensure its safe delivery. In India, a huge work force exists in the agricultural sector, followed by the industrial sector. Over 80 percent of the water supply is used for irrigation in agricultural sector and about 12 percent in industry.

Article Source: http://www.thestatesman.com/news/opinion/the-water-link-to-job-creation/128204.html
Publication date: 07 March 2016.

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